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High Court claims frequency – Music and Football dominate

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Recent data compiled by law firm RPC sheds an interesting light on the claims trends in the High Court. The data, covering the 12 months up till 31st march 2017, shows that the most frequent claimants using the High Court were from the Music and Professional Football sectors.

PPL, originally established in 1934 and who govern and license public music broadcasting rules in the UK, were the most frequent litigators with 107 cases bought before the Court. The Performing Rights Society (PRS) who also license various music broadcasting channels were the third most litigious, with 27 cases submitted. In second place with 39 claims bought was the Football Association, with football broadcasters Sky and BT also bringing 14 claims between them. Back in 2013 the FA bought only 5 cases, the recent increase being a clear indicator of broadcasters taking a tougher line with individuals or businesses that are infringing their intellectual property rights around the broadcast of English football.

Both music and football broadcast rights holders are targeting pubs, restaurants and nightclubs that broadcast music and football without the relevant licensing authority in place, with such claims making up 23% of the PPL’s total during this period. Rounding out the top 5 High Court claimants list were Barclays Bank in fourth, and HM Revenue & Customs in fifth.

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