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Casino Wins In Supreme Court Dispute

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Casino Wins In Supreme Court Dispute

Phil Ivey, 10 times winner of the World Series Of Poker and one of the world’s best known professional gamblers, has
recently lost his bid to recover £7.7m in winnings from a game of Punto Banco (a Casino card game based on baccarat) that
took place in 2012 at Crockfords Club in London.

Genting Casino’s, owners of Crockfords, had previously secured a majority decision in the Court of Appeal in 2016 claiming
that Ivey had used a technique called ‘edge sorting’, which they claimed is not a legitimate playing strategy. Ivey
maintained he had one fairly, and the Supreme Court action centred on whether dishonesty was a necessary element in an
offence of cheating.

Edge sorting involves a player spotting tiny differences in the patterns on the reverse side of playing cards, which over
time indicates to a player the identity of the cards. 40 year old Ivey didn’t actually handle the cards, but intimated to
the croupier that rotating certain cards was important to him for superstitious reasons. 

Court of Appeal judge Lady Justice Arden said that the Gamling Act 2005 provided that someone may cheat without dishonesty or intention to deceive: depending on the circumstances it may be enough that he simply interferes with the process of the
game”

Stephen Parkinson of Kingsley Napley, the law firm representing Crockfords, said:

This is one of the most significant decisions in criminal law in a generation. The concept of dishonesty is central to a
whole range of offences, including fraud.”


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