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Apple facing Group Action claim over MacBook Pro display deficiencies

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Global tech giant Apple is likely to face a group-action claim over multiple problems and failures of the displays on its popular MacBook Pro range. Apple, one of the ‘big 5’ global technology companies and the first US company to be valued at over $1 trillion, is the defendant in a complaint filed in a California district court that alleges a number of breaches of state and federal consumer protection laws, in addition to fraudulent concealment.

Lead claimant Mahan Taleshpour is suing Apple on behalf of American consumers who have purchased a MacBook Pro from the model years of 2016 to date. Taleshpour claims that Apple was aware of - and decided to cover up - a design defect in the connection cable between the MacBook Pro's base and display. It is alleged that this manufacturing defect results in the cable connecting the base and screen to gradually wear down over time. He also claims that Apple built the MacBook Pro range with a ribbon cable connector that was a few millimetres too short, causing the cable to squash against the notebook’s display controller board. The complaint filed claims that:

At first, these cables function correctly. But their length and placement causes them to rub against the control board each time the laptop is opened or closed…this consistent rubbing slowly causes the cables wear and tear over time."

Out of Warranty

It goes on to claim that the defect does is not apparent during the first 12+ months of operation. However, after a longer period of time, many users have noticed that the display backlight starts to fail, partially at first, but then completely when the devices screen is opened beyond forty degrees. By this time,the laptop is not covered under warranty and users typically have to shell out several hundred dollars to replace the screen.

It is claimed that Apple was very aware of the problem, as newer models were now equipped with a longer connector cable. The complaint also claims the failures were so common that Apple Store ‘Genius Bar’ staff could quickly diagnose the cause. Taleshpour's lawyers also highlighted that in 2019 Apple launched a free repair program for the 13-inch models. However, 15-inch models were not included in this repair program, and the claim states that all MacBook Pro buyers, regardless of whether they got a repair or a fixed model, are due compensation.

Whilst the claim seeks damages and associated legal fees, though it is anticipated that a probable outcome is an overall settlement that includes a small amount of compensation for MacBook Pro customers.

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If you are thinking about taking legal action against another individual or company but are worried about the costs involved, Advantage Litigation Services have the skills and expertise to help you find a way of funding commercial litigation without risking your personal finances or those of your business. Click here to contact us today or call 0800 160 1298 to see how we can help.

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